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Casino Luxembourg

Exhibitions

Jessica Diamond, Ran which Falls as Yes, 1998. Peinture murale. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

Loïc Ragénès, Ours polaire, 2005. Peinture murale. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

1.10 — 4.12.2005

L’humanité mise à nu et l’art en frac, même

artist(s): Julien Audebert, Renaud Auguste-Dormeuil, Maurizio Cattelan, Martin Creed, François Curlet, Philippe Decrauzat, Jessica Diamond, Gabriele Di Matteo, Eric Duyckaerts / Jean-Pierre Khazem, Dominique Figarella, Ghazel, Ann Veronica Janssens, Hamid Maghraoui, Stephen Marsden, Paul Mc Carthy, Loïc Raguénès, Dario Robleto, Thomas Schütte, Sigurdur Arni Sigurdsson, Grazia Toderi, Xavier Veilhan, Erwin Wurm
curator(s): Emmanuel Latreille, Enrico Lunghi

The Frac Languedoc-Roussillon was created in 1983 as part of France's decentralisation policy, and nowadays contains close on 750 works by French and international artists, many of whom are among the leading figures of their generation. The orientation of the collection is markedly defined by the choices made by successive directors, and by the collection's rootedness in the region, which is dense and rich in terms of contemporary art.

For L'humanité mis à nu et l'art en frac, même the two curators, Emmanuel Latreille and Enrico Lunghi, have chosen to approach the collection by way of depictions and representations of things human, and man's place in society, as expressed by varying artistic methods. From submissiveness to the frenzied pace of present-day life as shown by Hamid Maghraoui to the exhausting attempts to do nothing by an artist like Erwin Wurm, from Grazia Toderi's dreamlike encounter with the other to the cruel metamorphosis of the body in the grip of the sex and entertainment industry by an artist like Paul McCarthy, from the brave and tireless subversive work of Ghazel to dismantle the codes of women's subordination to the immemorial quest to read the human tragedy in the starry sky by Renaud Auguste-Dormeuil, each work on view opens up an inexhaustible arena of reflection and contemplation.

The exhibition's title is inspired directly from Gabriele Di Matteo's work ''L'humanité mise à nu'' (2004), and larksomely paraphrases Marcel Duchamp's famous ''Large Glass - The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even'' [Le Grand Verre - La mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires, même]. In Gabriele Di Matteo's work, human history, from the year dot up to the present day, is unfurled in the form of 200 small paintings in which human beings are represented absolutely naked. This large installation, at once tautological, ironical and witty, challenges both representational codes and the construction of major narratives, and thus becomes symbolic of the whole exhibition.

The presentation of this collection at the Casino Luxembourg is part of the series of projects such as Stanze pour la peinture (collection of the Musée d'Art Moderne in Saint-Etienne) in 1996, Affinités électives (collection of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam) in 1997, the Hess Collection in 1998 and Many Colored Objects Placed Side by Side to Form a Row of Many Colored Objects (Annick and Anton Herbert collection) in 2000.

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partners

In collaboration with the Frac Languedoc-Roussillon.

images

Jessica Diamond, Ran which Falls as Yes, 1998. Peinture murale. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

Loïc Ragénès, Ours polaire, 2005. Peinture murale. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

Martin Creed, Work n°262, 2001. Installation in situ, ballons en latex vert. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

Paul McCarthy, Spaghetti Man, 1993. Installation in situ. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.

SIgurdur Arni SIgurdssons, Sans Titre, 2000. Huile sur toile. Collection du Frac Languedoc-Roussillon. © Christian Mosar.