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Casino Luxembourg

Exhibitions

Ger Van Elk, The well-shaven cactus, 1970. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.

Gino de Dominicis, Tentativo di Volo, 1970. Vidéo, bande vidéo 1/2 pouce, noir et blanc, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne / Christian Mosar.

Jan Dibbets, 12 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective, 1969. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, couleur, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.

27.3 — 6.6.2004

Ready to Shoot – Fernsehgalerie Gerry Schum / videogalerie schum

artist(s): Gerry Schum
curator(s): Barbara Hess, Ulrike Groos, Ursula Wevers

The exhibition, which is being held more than 20 years after the Gerry Schum exhibition organised by the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (1979-1980), is the first comprehensive retrospective of one of the most ambitious and complex art projects of the late 1960s and early 1970s. In addition to the two television exhibitions Land Art (1969) and Identifications (1970), this retrospective, initiated by the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, encompasses the first documentary works commissioned from Gerry Schum, and short television interventions, as well as all the works produced by the videogalerie schum (1971-1973). The art works are documented and illustrated by stills of shoots taken by Ursula Wevers. From 1968 to 1972, Ursula Wevers, Gerry Schum's principal associate, played a large part in the productions of the Fernsehgalerie Gerry Schum and the videogalerie schum. The films and videos presented as part of this exhibition, as well as the original documentary material, come for the most part from the private archives of Gerry Schum and Ursula Wevers (Cologne).

The concept of the Fernsehgalerie Gerry Schum (television gallery) was motivated by the idea of finding a way of using the mass medium television for artistic purposes and, consequently, making art more accessible to a wide public. This idea, whose aim was to create works of art specially for television rather than making and presenting documentaries about artists, should be put in the context of the emerging artistic trends of that period, such as conceptual and process art, Land Art, and Arte Povera. These latter aspired to going beyond the limits hitherto imposed by sculpture and painting, both traditional art disciplines. The Fernsehgalerie Gerry Schum was actually involved with radical innovations, the extension of art to the film world in an attempt to find a unity between work and medium, and a redefinition of television as an artistic medium aimed at a mass audience. The private collection would somehow gradually disappear in favour of increased communication with a wider public.

In 1971, after their work with television, Gerry Schum and Ursula Wevers set up the videogalerie schum in Düsseldorf where, until Gerry Schum's death in 1973, video works were produced in collaboration with many international artists. The gallery thus became a forerunner and pioneer in the use of video as a medium of artistic expression.

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The exhibition Ready to Shoot - Fernsehgalerie Gerry Schum/ videogalerie Schum, initiated by the Kunsthalle Düsseldorf (14 December 2003 - 14 March 2004) will be on view at the Casino Luxembourg from 27 March to 6 June 2004, and at the Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serravles in Porto (Portugal) from 23 July to 10 October 2004.

 

images

Ger Van Elk, The well-shaven cactus, 1970. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.

Gino de Dominicis, Tentativo di Volo, 1970. Vidéo, bande vidéo 1/2 pouce, noir et blanc, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne / Christian Mosar.

Jan Dibbets, 12 Hours Tide Object with Correction of Perspective, 1969. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, couleur, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.

Joseph Beuys, Filz-TV, 1970. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, son. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.

Klaus Rinke, Ohne Titel, 1970. Vidéo, film 16 mm, noir et blanc, silencieux. © Ursula Wevers, Cologne.