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Casino Luxembourg

Exhibitions

Seamus Farrell, Standardized norm - form entrance, 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, Naughts & Crosses, 2005. Vidéo. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, Paintexplosion, 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.

16.7 — 18.9.2005

Seamus Farrell – 5 Rooms, 5 Stories, 5 Problems and a Hallway

artist(s): Seamus Farrell
curator(s): Enrico Lunghi

Seamus Farrell's work is built up in visual and cultural strata placed one on top of the other and then indissolubly interlinked. Indeed he comes up all the time against the complex reality of the world around us, making visible, in his own way, its sometimes unsuspected layers. This two-way process between art and life among other things is rendered by the way he salvages all kinds of objects, often humble, commonplace things, which he turns into visual gems carrying a wealth of meaning and allusiveness. And he does it all with a personal touch of humour.

At Casino Luxembourg, he has the use of five rooms and an entrance hall, plus the glazed frontage space. This gives him five problems to work out, and even a little over five stories to tell. Immediately upon entering, for instance, the visitor is supposed to pass through a wall from which some stereotypical silhouettes have been cut out: the man, the woman, the child, the physically disabled person in a wheelchair (Standardized Norm-Format Entrance). Each visitor can choose to enter through the opening that corresponds to them or rebelliously pick one of the others. Is this a device to measure current conformism? Or are we to take it that an art centre ultimately only takes in preformatted viewers? Or worse still, maybe, unbeknownst to them, it is formatting them automatically? 

Beyond the social, political, philosophical and other issues raised by everything Seamus Farrell has to offer, there is also the work on light, the body and movement, that is manifested in nearly all of his works. When he digs up old 70 mm films and unrolls them between two columns into a succession of transparent images, there suddenly comes the urge to restore the movement and reconstitute the action of the film merely by moving the viewer's eye and body (Da Reel / Da Loop). But the story too is called up; in their old-fashioned materiality and the imprint of the actors and characters that they preserve, these strips of cellulose, brought back from oblivion, from the scrap heap, tell of passing time and of the hopes and dreams of the people who produced them.

This struggle against oblivion is at work elsewhere too. To a sound recalling the whirr of old-fashioned projectors and a beating heart, the projection of a series of portraits of the people close to him acts both as a souvenir and as a cinematographic memento mori (Video Wall).

The installation of discharge pipes, plumbing and electrical cables through an exhibition room is perhaps just as much an absurd proposition as a metaphor for the body, or even an ironic look cast on the mania for networks in the world of today (Domestic Appliances / Useless Connections).

Absurdity, playfulness and derision also appear in gentle touches in Seamus Farrell's work (A door in the middle of the wall in the middle of the room, Unravelled Hygienic Column, Spectacles, Cornered Word / paint explosions) and many other works will be brought together in this exhibition.

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images

Seamus Farrell, Standardized norm - form entrance, 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, Naughts & Crosses, 2005. Vidéo. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, Paintexplosion, 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, Unravelled WC column cone, 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.

Seamus Farrell, A door in the middle of the room in the middle of the espace , 2005. Installation in situ. © Christian Mosar.