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Casino Luxembourg

Exhibitions

Eulalia Validosera, El Periodo (The Period), 2006. Installation in situ. Galeria Joan Prats, Barcelona. © Jessica Theis.

Bruno Baltzer, La gloire de mon père, série 3, juin 2009, 2009. 16 photographies couleur C-prints. © Jessica Theis. 

Carmit Gil, BUS, 2002. Sculpture, bois, aluminium, fer. Frank Elbaz, Paris. © Jessica Theis.

30.1 — 11.4.2010

everyday(s)

artist(s): Bruno Baltzer, David Bestué & Marc Vives, Christophe Büchel, Claude Closky, Christine Dupuis & Thorsten Beansch, Cao Fei, Carmit Gil, Takahiro Iwasaki, Christian Mosar, Valérie Mréjen, Paula Mueller, Danica Phelps, Pavel Smetana, Pier Stockholm, Andrijana Stojkocic, Jiri Thyn, Virginie Yassef
curator(s): Fabienne Bernardini, An Schiltz

Much of what we commonly refer to as the "everyday" remains an unspoken element of the nature of experience and hardly ever retains the focus of our attention. Comprising thousands of gestures and interactions in the public and private spheres, the everyday denotes the space-time in which the relations between the individual and society manifest themselves. A shared history, or rather histories, habits and inherited traditions take shape and are handed down through the practice of the everyday. While the relentless passing of time allows for this transmission by way of repetition, the process itself is never redundant: each "everyday life" is indeed unique - as is each of us who happens to live it - despite the fact that it is regulated by common norms, representations and experiences. The everyday is therefore intrinsically individual and collective at the same time. Yet the very concept of norms implies resistance and the quest for spaces of freedom. 

Defining the everyday as based merely on the predetermination induced by the internalisation of social rules and codes of conduct falls short of the truth, each context of practicality and each encounter between individuals being essentially singular. While characteristic gestures and expressions that we encounter in everyday reality hardly seem to evolve, their repetition over the course of time inevitably subjects them to change. Among other things, the plural suggested in the title of this exhibition - everyday(s) - refers to the notion of time, an intrinsic element in any critical reflection on the everyday. Indeed, it is the passing of time, which allows for repetition, and also for adaptation, reinterpretation or daily transformation.

Change itself can occasionally come about abruptly and violently, causing a disruption in the individual's or the collective's everyday. But even in the most "exceptional" of situations, a daily routine of sorts is quickly restored. The repetition of gestures - besides the obvious fact that it saves time and energy and requires less attention  - is furthermore conducive to a feeling of being safe and in control. Is not the frenzy of management and regulation to which individuals in Western societies readily subject themselves a means of upholding the illusion of endless continuity?

The exhibition everyday(s) presents eighteen artists whose works deal with the everyday or a fragment of our daily life. But while this "raw material" - the everyday under its various guises - is easily accessible to the extent that it is shared by each and every one of us, these artists disrupt the common experience by changing the perspective. The installations, videos, photographs, drawings and sculptures in this exhibition take their inspiration from everyday experiences, while retaining only fragments, impressions or specific situations. Taking the real and "ordinary" world as their point of departure, they deconstruct, distort or decontextualize reality by looking in a new way at the world that surrounds us and determines our lives day after day. Art as one tool of knowledge among many? Such is the hypothesis of the French philosopher Pierre-Henry Frangne: "If we want art to fulfil a genuine function in the production of knowledge, if we want art to tell us something real in its own way, we must conclude that the escape from the everyday and from the fragment to which it necessarily encourages us is nothing but a paradoxical means to recover them, and thus recover ourselves: to recover our everyday experience in which the entity of that which we call 'our life' pursues but never catches up with itself."

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images

Eulalia Validosera, El Periodo (The Period), 2006. Installation in situ. Galeria Joan Prats, Barcelona. © Jessica Theis.

Bruno Baltzer, La gloire de mon père, série 3, juin 2009, 2009. 16 photographies couleur C-prints. © Jessica Theis. 

Carmit Gil, BUS, 2002. Sculpture, bois, aluminium, fer. Frank Elbaz, Paris. © Jessica Theis.

Christine Dupuis & Thorsten Baensch, Kitchen, la cuisine transportable, 2001-2010. Installation in situ. © Jessica Theis.

Pier Stockholm, Prozac Garden, 2004-2010. Installation in situ. © Jessica Theis.

Takahiro Iwasaki, Out of Disorder / Tectonic Model, 2009. Installation in situ. Arataniurano Gallery, Tokyo. © Jessica Theis.

Virginie Yassef, Billy Montana (version 2), 2007. Installation in situ, étagère « Billy » IKEA, 58 étagères laminées laquées, 58 couleurs « Montana . Galerie GP & N Vallois, Paris. © Jessica Theis.